We Are Hiring! Summer 2018

Work with Winnipeg Trails!
We are currently hiring summer students.
**Not a student? Despair not. Apply anyway! See bottom**

We are looking for 5 high school, college or university students planning to return in the fall who want to work from the best “office” in Winnipeg… our growing network of trails and protected bike lanes!

Are you interested in a modern city? Do you like learning more about how cities plan for cycling and walking and accessibility and doing something about it?

Do you have a passion for the future of Winnipeg and its people?

Do you like nature, urban landscapes or spending time outdoors?

Do you like citizen science, city planning or helping people?

Are you social media savvy?

If you answered yes to any of the above, you might be a great fit.

Keep reading.

All applicants must be:

(a) between 15 and 30 years of age (inclusive) at the start of employment;

(b) registered as a full-time student during the preceding academic year;

(c) intending to return to school on a full-time basis during the next academic year;

(d) a student in a secondary, post-secondary, CEGEP (Quebec only), vocational or technical program;

(e) a Canadian Citizen, permanent resident, or person on whom refugee protection has been conferred under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act* and;

(f) legally entitled to work according to the relevant provincial / territorial legislation and regulations

We are hiring three (3) Trails Analysts, one (1) Junior Analyst, and one (1) Project Coordinator to work with us over the summer.

Some of the work will include use of mobile applications to communicate. All applicants should have access to a working smartphone, ideally both platforms or iOS only. Extra battery packs are handy.

All applicants should be familiar with Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, the CounterPoint app for counting traffic, and our own Winnipeg Trails app.

Timeline: Short term positions representing 8 weeks @ 30hrs/week between now and September 2018. Exact work hours and vacation time are flexible and negotiable, depending on start date and needs of project.

Workplace: Work will be carried out on site on trails throughout Winnipeg, and/or at home and/or at our headquarters in South Point Douglas.

How To Apply:

  1. Review the Job Descriptions below.
  2. Write a short email indicating which position you are applying for and describing why you think you would be a good fit for the position to coordinator@winnipegtrails.ca with the subject line “Summer 2018 Job Application”, and attach a brief resume.
  3. Apply as soon as possible.

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Trails Analyst Job Description

Winnipeg Trails is seeking trails analysts to help us better understand, communicate and disseminate the findings of the projects we undertake. Analysts will have a mixture of design skill and data analysis abilities. Analysts should have a strong interest in sustainable transportation principles and culture shift, and be ready to collect data in the field.

Analysts will be responsible for:
Collecting, Manipulating and analysing data.
Developing project-related communications materials.
Engaging members of the public.
Coordinating with other workers.
Using active and sustainable transportation when possible. (cycling, walking, skiing – a working bicycle, handcycle or related vehicle is an asset).

Analysts may be responsible for:
Conducting surveys.
Testing surveys for accessibility and user-friendliness,
Website content management.

The ideal candidate(s) will have:
Excellent communication skills, including social media skills.
Understanding of planning and engineering fields.
Good visual communications skills (Photography, Design).
High degree of organization.

Wage: $17/hr

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Junior Analyst Job Description

Winnipeg Trails is seeking Junior Analysts/Surveyors to help us better understand, communicate, and disseminate the findings of the projects we undertake. Junior Analysts should have a strong interest in sustainable transportation principles and culture shift, and be ready to talk to the public and collect data in the field.

Junior Analysts will be responsible for:
Setting up and taking down the surveying site and equipment.
Engaging members of the public to complete intercept surveys.
Conducting active transportation traffic counts in vicinity of the survey site.
Collecting data on the quality of the built environment,
Keeping equipment in good working order.
Using active transportation to and from surveying sites when possible. (cycling, walking, skiing – a working bicycle, handcycle or related vehicle is an asset),.

The ideal candidate(s) will have:
Excellent communication skills, including social media skills.
Visual communications skills (Photography, Design).
A high degree of organization.
An interest in what Winnipeg Trails does, and a strong motivation to learn more.

Wage: $11.15/hr

The ideal candidate for this position is likely in, or has just completed High School.

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Project Coordinator Job Description

Winnipeg Trails is seeking coordinators to run a diversity of projects in the fields of art, design, planning, research and communications. Our work revolved around developing sustainable transportation infrastructure and culture. Coordinators will work with the executive director, board, artists, designers, experts, regular staff and volunteers to ensure projects are carried on time and on budget.

Coordinators will be responsible for:
Project Management.
Working with artists and designers.
Engaging members of the public.
Working with the executive director to plan and implement projects.
Event planning.
Coordinating workers and volunteers.
Using active transportation to complete work activities when possible. (cycling, walking, skiing, wheelchair – a working bicycle, handcycle or related vehicle is an asset).

Coordinators may be responsible for:
Website content management.
Media relations.
Social media communications.
Working with planners and engineers.
Meetings with professionals and elected officials.
Strategic planning.
Budgeting.
Mapping.

The ideal candidate(s) will have:
Excellent communication skills, including social media skills.
Financial skills.
Visual communications skills (Photography, Design) are an asset.
High degree of organization.

Wage: $20/hr

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*We are always looking to hire great people and often have positions available that do not require that you meet the Canada Summer Jobs requirements. In fact, we could possible use your specialized skills and ideas. Write us a letter. Send us a resume. Tell what you can do and why you’d like to make a difference!

We are Hiring! Fall 2017

*November 22 Update

Thank you to all applicants for your interest in Winnipeg Trails!

We have now completed our hiring process. Successful applicants will have heard back about the position.

 

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Work with Winnipeg Trails this Fall/Winter!

We are looking for up to 6 people who want to work from the best “office” in Winnipeg—our growing network of trails and protected bike lanes!

Are you interested in a modern city? Do you like learning more about how cities plan for cycling and walking and accessibility and doing something about it?
Do you have a passion for the future of Winnipeg and its people?
Do you like nature, urban landscapes or spending time outdoors?
Do you like citizen science, city planning or helping people?
Are you social media savvy?

If you answered yes to any of the above, you might be a great fit.
Keep reading.

We are hiring up to six (6) Trails Surveyors to work with us over the Fall and upcoming Winter.

How To Apply:

  1. Review the Job Descriptions below.
  2. Write a short email describing why you think you would be a good fit for the position to coordinator@winnipegtrails.ca with the subject line “Winter Job Application” and attach a brief resume.
  3. Apply as soon as possible.

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Surveyor Job Description

Wage: $17/hr
Timeline: Short term position representing approximately 16 weeks @ 7.5hrs/week between now and April 2017. Exact work hours will be subject to other team member’s availability, but expect 2-3 shifts a week taking place in the evening, afternoon, and/or weekend. There is a potential to extend contract for next 3 years.
Workplace: Work will be carried out in teams of two on site on urban trails throughout Winnipeg, and/or at home and/or at our HQ in the East Exchange. Some surveying will take place outdoors in Winter.

Surveyors will be responsible for:
Using active transportation to and from surveying sites. (cycling, walking, skiing – a working bicycle is an asset),
Setting up and taking down the surveying site and equipment,
Engaging members of the public to complete the intercept survey,
Conducting traffic counts using the CounterPoint app in vicinity of the survey site,
Collecting data on the quality of the built environment,

Surveyors may be responsible for:
Testing surveys for accessibility and user-friendliness,
Reviewing methods to improve future surveys.

The ideal candidate(s) will have:
Excellent communication skills,
High degree of organization,
An understanding of CounterPoint,

Education: Ideal candidate for this position is attending or just finished high school, or attending Post-Secondary (Community College, CEGEP, Technical Institute, University) studies.

Note: Some of the work will include use of mobile applications to communicate. All applicants should have access to a working smartphone, ideally both platforms or iOS only, and extra battery packs.

Applying as a team of two is welcome and encouraged.

All applicants must be eligible to work in Canada.

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This project is in partnership with the University of Manitoba and the Children’s Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba.  Funding for this project is funded by the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada (HSFC) and the Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR)

From Royalwood to the Forks, and Back

Last Sunday, Dan (my trails analyst boyfriend – who is making me do this) and I biked to the forks from my parents’ suburban home (lame, I know). Usually we go north through Saint Boniface, but for the sake of a story, he dragged me on a longer route through Osborne I was unfamiliar with.

First, we rode down John Bruce Road to a pedestrian bridge to cross the Seine. This part of the bike ride was fine, as there was low traffic and we safely travelled on the street. We were able to converse and meander.

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After the Bridge we had to bike on St. Anne’s, which was probably the most unsafe part of the trip even though it was only 100 meters. We had to bike single file, keeping as straight and parallel as possible to the curb, while impossibly avoiding potholes and ruts which forced us off our seats to lower force of impact, all while vehicles travelling over 60 km/h whizzed by. Conversation was impossible and not enjoyable. At the approach to Bishop Grandin a right turn lane opens but we kept straight to enter the diamond lane and cross once the light turned green.

Next we had to cross St. Anne’s to get on the Bishop Grandin Greenway. Many times a vehicle has come to a stop past the stopline on the southbound left turn lane to Bishop, which cuts off the crosswalk and forces crossing pedestrians and cyclists closer to Bishop’s 80km/h traffic. However, on Sunday this thankfully did not happen. One more unsafe spot is crossing the southbound right turn radius as many drivers simply just don’t stop, cannot see, or are travelling way too fast. It is also difficult for us as pedestrians to judge whether the vehicle can see and is actually going to stop.

Finally we were on the Bishop Grandin Greenway, which is for the most part good, with exception being the turn lanes at Home Depot. We then turned north on Dakota, crossed St. Mary’s and continued on Dunkirk. Dunkirk bike lanes are a bit weird as the wide greenway type path turns into sidewalk at some points and back into Greenway. On the road there is a faded bike lane painted. As a cyclist am I expected to get on and off the greenway and road when the sidewalk sections come? – not sure. The Dunkirk greenway ends just after the golf course by the south Osborne Bridge; we then biked on the sidewalk. That bridge is way too scary. This area needs to be fixed.

Last time we biked this I didn’t feel comfortable on the road, and rode on the sidewalk. This time Dan took us down Hay; which was better but still only okay in my opinion as I was still with cars on a roadway.

At the end of Hay we went through a weird little maze of apartment walkway, back alley, dirt path through trees, parking lot and secondary roadway to reach a crushed stone path that went along the river. The very beginning of the path was a little too inclined and a little too tight of a turn radius to be comfortable to bike down. I cannot imagine this path would be accessible to a disabled person.

 
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The path spit us out under the railway at Stradbrook and Main where we crossed. At the crosswalk for main we pushed the button, waited, waited, pushed the button again, waited – at this point the man across that was there earlier than us crossed when no cars came and shrugged – and we did the same. The crosswalk light still did not come on, as we continued north. At the Forks we turned right on the green bike lanes and reached our destination.

The return trip was nearly identical except we turned right at main after the green Forks lanes to use the new bicycle crossing. There were pedestrians on the other side, and two cyclists on our side. The light turned green and everyone began crossing, Dan leading our side. A vehicle turning right onto Main from Assiniboine waited on the other side. Just as the pedestrians gave him enough room he began turning without looking at our direction and came very close to Dan. He apologized but ultimately should not have made the turn. After that we rode on the sidewalk until the crushed stone path leading us back down beside Osborne. We meandered through the maze somehow a different way and continued down Churchill for a change of scenery. This felt safe as almost no cars were present – the few that were passed us at safe speeds and gave us tons of room. We continued onto Jubilee, hooked a left at BDI and looped back onto Dunkirk from Kingston Row. The remainder of the bike ride went identical to the before trip just in inverse order. The safe areas felt safe, and the unsafe areas still felt unsafe.

Written by: Jennifer Sawatzky (Jen(ny))

Jenny is Dan’s partner. Currently she handles frozen yogurt, but hopes to own a coffee shop / truck combo in Berlin. She lives part time in their Volkswagen Westfalia, and in her spare time bikes, hikes, cross country skis, camps and plays volleyball. Her other spare time is spent entertaining —or tiring out— her golden doodle puppy Theodore. She is a devoted Winnipeg Trails app user, having won the initial ‘Gem Blast’ prize. Her username is HiddenJen. She is attending University in the fall, with an unknown as-of-yet end goal— she is open to suggestions.